University of Southern California

Stolen LinkedIn Passwords Posted Online

Posted on by mechling

In yet another example of why regularly changing your passwords is a good security practice, hackers have recently begun to sell nearly 120 million passwords allegedly stolen from LinkedIn during a 2012 attack. If you have not changed your LinkedIn password since 2012, your credentials may have been compromised by this breach, and you should change your password as soon as possible.

Here are a few computing security practices to keep in mind, in light of this event:

  • Change your passwords at least once per year.
  • Choose strong passwords of at least 12 characters. Learn more about how to create strong passwords here.
  • Do not use the same password for more than one account. That way, if hackers manage to obtain the password for one of your accounts, they won’t have easy access to your other accounts.
  • Stay alert for phishing scams, in which criminals may pose as site administrators asking you to update your login information. Learn more about how to recognize a phish here, and remember that no legitimate service will ask you to provide your login password via email.

For more information about the LinkedIn attack and stolen passwords, see:

http://thenextweb.com/insider/2016/05/18/hacker-is-selling-117-million-linkedin-logins-obtained-in-2012-breach/#gref
http://techcrunch.com/2016/05/18/117-million-linkedin-emails-and-passwords-from-a-2012-hack-just-got-posted-online/
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/19/business/linkedin-says-hackers-are-trying-to-sell-fruits-of-huge-2012-data-breach.html?_r=0http://www.businessinsider.com/linkedin-sends-password-reset-emails-after-breach-2016-5

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